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Tag: Michelle Kahlenberg

Summary Highlights of Important Research Presented at ACR Convergence 2023

November, 2023 At the recent ACR Convergence 2023, the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology, important lupus clinical trial data and breakthrough foundational research were presented. Following are highlights of work funded by the Lupus Research Alliance or supported in partnership with industry through our clinical affiliate Lupus Therapeutics. CAR-T Cell Therapy is […] Read More

Lupus Research Alliance Announces Four New Recipients of the Lupus Mechanisms and Targets Award

Winning projects will explore new potential treatment approaches to prevent lupus from developing or prevent or slow disease progression. New York, NY, April 20, 2023. The Lupus Research Alliance (LRA) today announced the newest Lupus Mechanisms and Targets Award grant recipients. The winning four projects collectively test potential treatment approaches to prevent lupus from developing […] Read More

Pivotal LRA-Funded Research Shared at Annual Rheumatology Meeting

November 15, 2021 The Lupus Research Alliance (LRA) supports research into causes and mechanisms of lupus, and identification of targets supporting the development of new therapies or cures for lupus patients. At this year’s meeting of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), 17 LRA-funded researchers presented their work to share discoveries with the thousands of […] Read More

Why People with Lupus Get Tell-Tale Rashes

February 27, 2020 A study led by Lupus Research Alliance grantee Dr. J. Michelle Kahlenberg of the University of Michigan has revealed one reason why people with lupus tend to get rashes. Dr. Kahlenberg and her team found that certain immune system molecules produced by people with lupus help bacteria gain a foothold on the […] Read More

Possible Reason Why Women at Greater Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

April 22, 2019 A study published in JCI Insight by researchers at University of Michigan Medical School suggests that the reason why women are more prone to autoimmune diseases than men may lie in excess levels of a protein VGLL3 in skin cells. Their study discovered that “too much VGLL3 in skin cells pushes the […] Read More
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