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Scientific Advisory Board 2007

Joseph E. Craft, MD (Chair)

Joseph E. Craft, MD  - Scientific Advisory Board Chair

Yale University School of Medicine’s Chief of the Section of Rheumatology and Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology) and Immunobiology, Dr. Joe Craft was named Chair of the Alliance’s Scientific Advisory Board in March 2003. Having received his undergraduate degree from UNC-Chapel Hill, Dr. Craft received his medical degree from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and did his postgraduate training at Yale University, where he has been on the faculty since 1985. At Yale, Dr. Craft directs a research laboratory devoted to understanding the etiology of lupus as well as instructs graduate and medical students. He is the author of over 110 scientific publications, and his research has been continually supported by the National Institutes of Health since 1985, where he is a current NIH MERIT award recipient. Dr. Craft is a member of several Boards of Trustees including that of the Lupus Clinical Trials Consortium, Inc. and National Arthritis Foundation, and was recently selected as one of the Fifty Postdoctoral Heroes of that organization.

John Atkinson, MD

John Atkinson, MD

John Atkinson received his B.A. and M.D. degrees from the University of Kansas. His training in internal medicine was at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the National Institutes of Health. His postdoctoral research training was with Sheldon Wolff and Michael Frank at the National Institutes of Health and with Charles Parker and Donald Shreffler at Washington University. He has been on the faculty of Washington University since 1976 and directed the Division of Rheumatology from 1976 to 1992. He was an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1976 to 1992. He was Physician-in-Chief at Barnes Hospital and Adolphus Busch Professor and Head of John Milliken Department of Medicine from 1992 to 1996. Dr. Atkinson is currently Professor of Medicine and of Molecular Microbiology. He is the first Samuel B. Grant Professor.

Jeffery A. Bluestone, PhD, UCSF

Jeffery A. Bluestone, PhD, UCSF

Dr. Bluestone, studies why the human body's immune system rejects or tolerates self and transplanted tissue and elucidating the biological basis for immunologic tolerance. He is interested in defining the critical importance of T-cell co-stimulation in T-cell activation, and he has developed a “human” form of the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, that in recent clinical trials demonstrated clear efficacy in blocking islet transplant reject and the progression of autoimmunity. In addition he is the Director of The Immune Tolerance Network, an NIH funded program to advance clinical research on immune tolerance. The ITN brings together more than 70 of the world's leading scientific researchers and clinical specialists from nearly 40 institutions in nine countries to coordinate human clinical testing of new therapies designed to bring about immune tolerance in kidney or insulin-producing beta cell transplantation, autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes, arthritis or lupus and immunologic treatments of asthma and allergic diseases. Finally, he has embarked on an effort to try and bring cellular therapy to the clinic in lupus and diabetes. Over the last few years, the critical importance of regulatory T lymphocytes in the maintenance of self-tolerance has been established.

Andrew Chan, MD, PhD

Andrew Chan, MD, PhD

Dr. Andrew Chan is currently Vice President, Research-Immunology for Genentech, Inc. His research interests have focused on how T and B cells regulate immune cell development and function. He has served on the faculty and Attending Rheumatologist at Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, MO), and an Associate Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Barbara K. Finck, MD

Barbara K. Finck, MD

Barbara K. Finck, MD is Vice President of Clinical Development for Protein Design Labs, Inc (PDL), Fremont CA. She joined PDL in 2003, at the time that PDL acquired Eos Biotechnology, So. San Francisco, CA. At Eos she had served as Vice President of Clinical Development and had initiated clinical trials with anti-alpha5,beta1 integrin monoclonal antibody as an antiangiogenic agent for solid tumors. From 1996 to 2001, Dr. Finck was the Medical Director at Immunex Corporation, Seattle, WA, responsible for the clinical development program for Enbrel® (TNFR fusion protein) for rheumatoid arthritis in adults and children. Prior to Immunex, Dr. Finck served as the Clinical Program Manager and Medical Monitor at ALZA Corporation. She received her medical and subspecialty training in Rheumatology from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where she served as Assistant Professor of Medicine.

David Hafler, MD

David Hafler, MD

Dr. Hafler is the Jack, Sadie and David Breakstone Professor of Neurology (Neuroscience) at the Harvard Medical School and a Physician at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He graduated Emory University with combined B.S. and M.Sc. degrees in biochemistry, and the University of Miami School of Medicine. He then completed his internship in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins followed by a neurology residency at Cornell Medical Center-New York Hospital in New York. Dr. Hafler received training in immunology at the Rockefeller University then at Harvard where he joined the faculty in 1984. He is a member of the Program in Immunology at Harvard Medical School and is on the faculty of the Harvard-MIT Health Science and Technology program where he has been actively involved in the training of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. Dr. Hafler has been elected to membership in the American Society of Clinical Investigation, The American Neurological Association, the Alpha Omega Society, and was a Harvey Weaver Scholar of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. He is currently a member of the editorial boards for Journal of Clinical Investigation, Cellular Immunology, Clinical Immunology, and Journal of Neuroimmunology, and is co-founder of the Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies. Dr. Hafler heads the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology in the Center for Neurologic Diseases, Harvard Medical School. He is a clinical scientist with a research interest in understanding the mechanism of autoimmunity with a particular interest in inflammatory central nervous system diseases. He leads the NIH Autoimmunity Prevention Center Grant at Harvard, and recently received the 1st National Multiple Sclerosis five year Collaborative Center Award with Dr. Eric Lander of the Whitehead Institute for tackling the MS genetic effort.

E. Nigel Harris, MPhil, MD, DM

E. Nigel Harris, MPhil, MD, DM

Eon Nigel Harris is the Vice Chancellor of the University of West Indies (UWI). Prior to this appointment he was the Dean and Senior VP for Academic Affairs of the Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM). A graduate from Howard University (BS), Yale University (MPhil), and the University of Pennsylvania (MD), Dr. Harris completed his residency in internal medicine at UWI and was awarded a DM (Doctor of Medicine) degree. In 1983, Dr. Harris moved to the Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital in London, England to do a fellowship in Rheumatology. In 1985, he moved to St. Thomas Hospital in London to start the Lupus Research Laboratory with Doctors Graham Hughes and Azzudin Gharavi. Nigel Harris’ research career has largely been devoted to the study of antiphospholipid antibodies.

Brian Kotzin, MD

Brian Kotzin, MD

Dr. Brian Kotzin is Vice President, Global Clinical Development at Amgen in California. Prior to joining Amgen, Dr. Kotzin was a professor in the departments of medicine and immunology, and a co-head of the Division of Clinical Immunology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. Dr. Kotzin served as chairman of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH) Autoimmunity Centers of Excellence Steering Committee, and was a director and principal investigator at the Denver Autoimmunity Center of Excellence. Dr. Kotzin earned his medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine and completed his residency at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. He completed a fellowship in Rheumatology (Medicine) at Beth Israel Hospital and a fellowship in immunology at Stanford University.

Terry Strom, MD

Terry Strom, MD

Dr. Strom is Chief of Immunology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Strom is an expert on organ transplantation and immune tolerance—the immune system's ability to recognize and "tolerate" the body's own cells and molecules while protecting against foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses. In autoimmune diseases such as lupus, defects in tolerance lead the immune system to attack healthy tissues in the body. Dr. Strom received his MD degree in 1966 from the University of Illinois, Chicago, where he subsequently completed an internship in medicine. He has received numerous honors and awards for his work.


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