HOME
Leading the way to a cure

PRESS RELEASES

Alliance for Lupus Research Awards More Than $7 Million in Grant Funding – Continues to Futher Mission To Improve Treatment and Find a Cure for Lupus

April 18, 2013

 Target Identification in Lupus (TIL) Grants Announced for 2013

 

New York, NY – April 16, 2013 -- The Alliance for Lupus Research (ALR) – the world’s largest private funder of lupus research – today announced the Target Identification in Lupus (TIL) medical research grant awards, totaling nearly $7 million, which support the ALR mission of finding better treatments and ultimately preventing and curing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus), a debilitating autoimmune disease. The organization awarded almost $9 million in lupus research in 2012 and, since 1999, has now dedicated nearly $81 million to understanding the disease.


Under the
ALR’s TIL grant program, and once passed through the organization’s rigorous, multi-level peer review, investigators leverage a two-year award to research the most promising new treatments and novel therapeutic approaches, and a possible cure.  Scientists who are delivering promising results also have the opportunity to continue their investigations through a third-year grant extension.

 

“Lupus is a very complex disease to diagnose, treat and defeat, and the ALR wants to propel the work of our most talented investigators,” said Kenneth M. Farber, ALR President. “We’re in a position — thanks to the generous support of our donors — to offer third-year funding to the best of the best.  That’s going to propel the quest for a cure.”

 

The ALR is expecting great things. Third-year funding is based on past success, which is reviewed by ALR’s Scientific Advisory Board.  Work of the most innovative, pioneering scientists will receive third-year awards of up to $200,000. In the first year of this new extension program, 10 TIL grantees have been selected for third-year funding with grants totaling $1.9 million.  All lupus research funded under the TIL program is focused on studies that can move quickly from the laboratory to the patient’s bedside.

Included in this round of awards are innovative studies to:

 

·      Define whether the immune regulators that contribute to lupus nephritis are linked to the dysregulation of cellular metabolism, leading to atherosclerosis;

·      Examine the suitability of two proteins known to play key roles in interferon production as targets for development of novel small molecule drugs for the prevention and treatment of SLE with increased specificity and reduced side effects.

·      Examine a specific major inflammatory cytokine relevant to SLE to try to develop more targeted therapies with less damage to major organs such as the kidneys;

·      Gain understanding of pathogenic mechanisms driving kidney diseases and more specific assays to enhance prognosis and treatment;

·      Examine B lymphocyte receptors to determine whether targeted interaction with these cells could eliminate its amplifying effect on autoantibody generation and subsequent organ and cell injury;

·      Develop molecules that selectively target an enzyme that plays a role in regulating immune responses to provide lead compounds for new therapeutics in SLE;

·      Explore whether lupus disease presentation or progression can be prevented or diminished through the alteration of T cell metabolism using a battery of known metabolic inhibitors;

·      Determine how enzyme dysfunction leads to the development of SLE and related autoimmune disorders to provide new avenues for the development of novel therapies for treatment;

·      Study a series of molecules responsible for B cell survival and development to dissect the importance of the individual interactions to development SLE disease to provide potential therapeutic agents specifically to block critical interactions the drive SLE disease;

 

The Alliance for Lupus Research TIL Grants Funded in 2013 include:

 

Principal Investigator

Research Project

Institution

Anne Davidson, MBBS

Inhibition of IL-6 trans-signaling in SLE

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

Laurie Davis, Ph.D.

TREM-1 in Lupus Nephritis

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Michael Holers, M.D.

The CR2:C3d Receptor:  Ligand Interaction as Therapeutic Target in Lupus

University of Colorado, Denver

Michael Karin, Ph.D.

New Targets for Treatment of Glucocorticoid-resistant Lupus

University of California, San Diego

Gang Lin, PhD

Immunoproteasome Selective Inhibitors for Lupus Treatment

Joan & Stanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Laurence Morel, Ph.D.

CD4 T Cell Metabolism in SLE: Characterization and Target Identification

University of Florida

Fred Perrino, Ph.D.

Targeting DNA Polynucleotides in Lupus

Wake Forest University Health Science

William Stohl, M.D., Ph.D.

The Roles of the Individual Elements of the BAFF Axis in Murine SLE

USC/University of Southern California

Barbara Vilen, Ph.D.

The Role of Immune Complexes and BAFF in Promoting Atherosclerosis in Lupus

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


“The ALR believes that this year’s TIL grantees will advance the science and medicine of lupus.  We congratulate this distinguished group of scientists and look forward to reviewing their findings,” said Dr. Mary Crow, Chair of the ALR’s Scientific Advisory Board.

More information about these and other ALR-funded research grants may be found at www.lupusresearch.org.

About Lupus
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus) is a chronic autoimmune disease that can affect the joints and almost every major organ in the body, including the heart, kidneys, skin, lungs, and brain. As many as 1.5 million people in the United States have lupus which affects mostly women during childbearing years, though men and children can have the disease. Lupus is three times more common in African-American women than in Caucasian women and is also more prevalent in women of Latino, Asian, and Native American descent.

About the ALR
The Alliance for Lupus Research (ALR) is a national voluntary health organization dedicated to finding better treatments and ultimately preventing and curing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus), a debilitating autoimmune disease. The organization is based in New York City and chaired by Robert Wood Johnson IV, a member of the founding family of Johnson & Johnson. Since its founding in 1999, the ALR has given more money to lupus research than any non-governmental agency in the world. The board of directors funds all administrative and fundraising costs, allowing one hundred percent of all donations from the public, and the proceeds of our signature grassroots fundraising program, Walk with Us to Cure Lupus, to go directly to support research programs. More information can be found at
www.lupusresearch.org.

###


Alliance for Lupus Research Awards More Than $7 Million in Grant Funding – Continues to Futher Mission To Improve Treatment and Find a Cure for Lupus

April 18, 2013

 Target Identification in Lupus (TIL) Grants Announced for 2013

 

New York, NY – April 16, 2013 -- The Alliance for Lupus Research (ALR) – the world’s largest private funder of lupus research – today announced the Target Identification in Lupus (TIL) medical research grant awards, totaling nearly $7 million, which support the ALR mission of finding better treatments and ultimately preventing and curing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus), a debilitating autoimmune disease. The organization awarded almost $9 million in lupus research in 2012 and, since 1999, has now dedicated nearly $81 million to understanding the disease.


Under the
ALR’s TIL grant program, and once passed through the organization’s rigorous, multi-level peer review, investigators leverage a two-year award to research the most promising new treatments and novel therapeutic approaches, and a possible cure.  Scientists who are delivering promising results also have the opportunity to continue their investigations through a third-year grant extension.

 

“Lupus is a very complex disease to diagnose, treat and defeat, and the ALR wants to propel the work of our most talented investigators,” said Kenneth M. Farber, ALR President. “We’re in a position — thanks to the generous support of our donors — to offer third-year funding to the best of the best.  That’s going to propel the quest for a cure.”

 

The ALR is expecting great things. Third-year funding is based on past success, which is reviewed by ALR’s Scientific Advisory Board.  Work of the most innovative, pioneering scientists will receive third-year awards of up to $200,000. In the first year of this new extension program, 10 TIL grantees have been selected for third-year funding with grants totaling $1.9 million.  All lupus research funded under the TIL program is focused on studies that can move quickly from the laboratory to the patient’s bedside.

Included in this round of awards are innovative studies to:

 

·      Define whether the immune regulators that contribute to lupus nephritis are linked to the dysregulation of cellular metabolism, leading to atherosclerosis;

·      Examine the suitability of two proteins known to play key roles in interferon production as targets for development of novel small molecule drugs for the prevention and treatment of SLE with increased specificity and reduced side effects.

·      Examine a specific major inflammatory cytokine relevant to SLE to try to develop more targeted therapies with less damage to major organs such as the kidneys;

·      Gain understanding of pathogenic mechanisms driving kidney diseases and more specific assays to enhance prognosis and treatment;

·      Examine B lymphocyte receptors to determine whether targeted interaction with these cells could eliminate its amplifying effect on autoantibody generation and subsequent organ and cell injury;

·      Develop molecules that selectively target an enzyme that plays a role in regulating immune responses to provide lead compounds for new therapeutics in SLE;

·      Explore whether lupus disease presentation or progression can be prevented or diminished through the alteration of T cell metabolism using a battery of known metabolic inhibitors;

·      Determine how enzyme dysfunction leads to the development of SLE and related autoimmune disorders to provide new avenues for the development of novel therapies for treatment;

·      Study a series of molecules responsible for B cell survival and development to dissect the importance of the individual interactions to development SLE disease to provide potential therapeutic agents specifically to block critical interactions the drive SLE disease;

 

The Alliance for Lupus Research TIL Grants Funded in 2013 include:

 

Principal Investigator

Research Project

Institution

Anne Davidson, MBBS

Inhibition of IL-6 trans-signaling in SLE

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research

Laurie Davis, Ph.D.

TREM-1 in Lupus Nephritis

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Michael Holers, M.D.

The CR2:C3d Receptor:  Ligand Interaction as Therapeutic Target in Lupus

University of Colorado, Denver

Michael Karin, Ph.D.

New Targets for Treatment of Glucocorticoid-resistant Lupus

University of California, San Diego

Gang Lin, PhD

Immunoproteasome Selective Inhibitors for Lupus Treatment

Joan & Stanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Laurence Morel, Ph.D.

CD4 T Cell Metabolism in SLE: Characterization and Target Identification

University of Florida

Fred Perrino, Ph.D.

Targeting DNA Polynucleotides in Lupus

Wake Forest University Health Science

William Stohl, M.D., Ph.D.

The Roles of the Individual Elements of the BAFF Axis in Murine SLE

USC/University of Southern California

Barbara Vilen, Ph.D.

The Role of Immune Complexes and BAFF in Promoting Atherosclerosis in Lupus

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


“The ALR believes that this year’s TIL grantees will advance the science and medicine of lupus.  We congratulate this distinguished group of scientists and look forward to reviewing their findings,” said Dr. Mary Crow, Chair of the ALR’s Scientific Advisory Board.

More information about these and other ALR-funded research grants may be found at www.lupusresearch.org.

About Lupus
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus) is a chronic autoimmune disease that can affect the joints and almost every major organ in the body, including the heart, kidneys, skin, lungs, and brain. As many as 1.5 million people in the United States have lupus which affects mostly women during childbearing years, though men and children can have the disease. Lupus is three times more common in African-American women than in Caucasian women and is also more prevalent in women of Latino, Asian, and Native American descent.

About the ALR
The Alliance for Lupus Research (ALR) is a national voluntary health organization dedicated to finding better treatments and ultimately preventing and curing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus), a debilitating autoimmune disease. The organization is based in New York City and chaired by Robert Wood Johnson IV, a member of the founding family of Johnson & Johnson. Since its founding in 1999, the ALR has given more money to lupus research than any non-governmental agency in the world. The board of directors funds all administrative and fundraising costs, allowing one hundred percent of all donations from the public, and the proceeds of our signature grassroots fundraising program, Walk with Us to Cure Lupus, to go directly to support research programs. More information can be found at
www.lupusresearch.org.

###



1.5 million

people in the U.S. have Lupus.

90 million

dollars committed to lupus research by the Alliance for Lupus Research.


We're walking across the United States to raise awareness and funds for lupus research.

Can't make it? Join our National Virtual Walk to participate anytime, anywhere.


Show your support by visiting the Alliance for Lupus Research online store. Discover the perfect gift, or prepare for a walk with our selection of apparel and accessories.