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ALLIANCE FOR LUPUS RESEARCH ANNOUNCES $2 MILLION IN FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS AND MOLECULAR PATHWAYS (FGMP) GRANTS

October 26, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

 

ALLIANCE FOR LUPUS RESEARCH ANNOUNCES $2 MILLION IN FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS AND MOLECULAR PATHWAYS PROGRAM (FGMP) GRANTS

 Additional 2011 Target Identification in Lupus (TIL) Grant Awarded

 

New York, NY – October 26, 2011 -- The Alliance for Lupus Research (ALR) – the world’s largest private funder of lupus research – has announced an additional $2 million in research grants as part of the Functional Genomics and Molecular Pathways (FGMP) program and an additional 2011 Target Identification in Lupus (TIL) grant. Studies within this program focus on determining how the genes identified by the SLE Genetics (SLEGEN) Consortium may have a role in lupus and provide further information about the molecular pathways modulated by these genes. These studies support the ALR mission of finding better treatments and ultimately preventing and curing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus), a debilitating autoimmune disease. The ALR has funded more than $6 million in research this year, and $67 million since 1999.

 

“The Alliance for Lupus Research remains committed to funding research for which improving lives is the primary objective, and the FGMP program is intensely focused on understanding genetic characteristics of the disease,” said ALR President Ken Farber. “Genetic research in SLE is a critical platform in identifying disease susceptibility and severity. Understanding risk will help scientists develop better, more targeted treatments.”

 

Included in this round of awards are novel studies to:

        better understand the roles of the ACP5 gene and its related protein (TRAP) have in metabolizing interferon;

        take a closer look at the simultaneous genetic variations required for lupus to develop;

        answer important questions about two genes involved in the development in lupus and the B cell-derived plasma cells that are involved in the production of autoantibodies;

        identify genetic variants in the complement immune system that contribute to kidney damage in people with lupus

        more closely define the role the gene PTPN22 has in immune cell hyperactivity

        analyze the MHC region in lupus and its contribution to the disease; and,

        investigate the activity of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs) and how blocking them may impact lupus.

 

 

“Our scientific advisory board closely reviews each application, using a rigorous and multi step, peer-review process, to identify and fund those studies that meet strict criteria including impact of the project on lupus, appropriateness of the experimental methods and design used, originality, qualifications of the investigator(s), availability of support services, suitability of facilities, and appropriateness of the proposed budget,” said Mr. Farber. “Because of this comprehensive process, ALR-funded studies continue to be an important conduit in understanding complex facets of this complicated disease.”

 

Research studies awarded FGMP funding include:

 

Principal Investigator

Research Project

Institution

 

Yanick Crow, Ph.D.

Pathways Linking Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase, Interferon, and Lupus

University of Manchester, Manchester UK

 

John P. Atkinson, M.D.

Complement Mutations in End Stage Renal Disease Lupus Patients

Washington University School of Medicine

 

Derry C. Roopenian, Ph.D.

Novel Approach to Modeling the Functional Genomics of Human SLE in Mice

The Jackson Laboratory

 

Anne Satterthwaite, Ph.D.

Functional Relationships Between the Lupus Susceptibility LociLyn and Ets1

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Katherine A. Siminovitch, M.D.

Defining Functional Implications of a Human SLE Risk Allele in Mice

University Health Network

 

Lindsey Ann Criswell, M.D., Ph.D.

Functional Genomics and Pathway Analysis of the MCH Region in SLE

The Regents of the University of California, San Francisco

 

 

 

 

Additional 2011 TIL grant:

 

Principal Investigator

Research Project

Institution

 

David Pisetsky, M.D., Ph.D.

Nucleic Acid Binding Polymers in the Treatment for SLE (TIL Research Program)

Duke University Medical Center

 

 

About the ALR

The Alliance for Lupus Research (ALR) is a national voluntary health organization dedicated to finding better treatments and ultimately preventing and curing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus), a debilitating autoimmune disease. The organization is based in New York City and chaired by Robert Wood Johnson IV, a member of the founding family of Johnson & Johnson. Since its founding in 1999, the ALR has given more money to lupus research than any non-governmental agency in the world. The board of directors funds all administrative and fundraising costs, allowing one hundred percent of all donations from the public, and the proceeds of our signature grassroots fundraising program, Walk with Us To Cure Lupus, to go directly to support research programs. The organization has awarded more than $6 million in grants this year and, since 1999, has dedicated over $67 million to understanding the disease. More information can be found at www.lupusresearch.org.

 

# # #


ALLIANCE FOR LUPUS RESEARCH ANNOUNCES $2 MILLION IN FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS AND MOLECULAR PATHWAYS (FGMP) GRANTS

October 26, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

 

ALLIANCE FOR LUPUS RESEARCH ANNOUNCES $2 MILLION IN FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS AND MOLECULAR PATHWAYS PROGRAM (FGMP) GRANTS

 Additional 2011 Target Identification in Lupus (TIL) Grant Awarded

 

New York, NY – October 26, 2011 -- The Alliance for Lupus Research (ALR) – the world’s largest private funder of lupus research – has announced an additional $2 million in research grants as part of the Functional Genomics and Molecular Pathways (FGMP) program and an additional 2011 Target Identification in Lupus (TIL) grant. Studies within this program focus on determining how the genes identified by the SLE Genetics (SLEGEN) Consortium may have a role in lupus and provide further information about the molecular pathways modulated by these genes. These studies support the ALR mission of finding better treatments and ultimately preventing and curing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus), a debilitating autoimmune disease. The ALR has funded more than $6 million in research this year, and $67 million since 1999.

 

“The Alliance for Lupus Research remains committed to funding research for which improving lives is the primary objective, and the FGMP program is intensely focused on understanding genetic characteristics of the disease,” said ALR President Ken Farber. “Genetic research in SLE is a critical platform in identifying disease susceptibility and severity. Understanding risk will help scientists develop better, more targeted treatments.”

 

Included in this round of awards are novel studies to:

        better understand the roles of the ACP5 gene and its related protein (TRAP) have in metabolizing interferon;

        take a closer look at the simultaneous genetic variations required for lupus to develop;

        answer important questions about two genes involved in the development in lupus and the B cell-derived plasma cells that are involved in the production of autoantibodies;

        identify genetic variants in the complement immune system that contribute to kidney damage in people with lupus

        more closely define the role the gene PTPN22 has in immune cell hyperactivity

        analyze the MHC region in lupus and its contribution to the disease; and,

        investigate the activity of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs) and how blocking them may impact lupus.

 

 

“Our scientific advisory board closely reviews each application, using a rigorous and multi step, peer-review process, to identify and fund those studies that meet strict criteria including impact of the project on lupus, appropriateness of the experimental methods and design used, originality, qualifications of the investigator(s), availability of support services, suitability of facilities, and appropriateness of the proposed budget,” said Mr. Farber. “Because of this comprehensive process, ALR-funded studies continue to be an important conduit in understanding complex facets of this complicated disease.”

 

Research studies awarded FGMP funding include:

 

Principal Investigator

Research Project

Institution

 

Yanick Crow, Ph.D.

Pathways Linking Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase, Interferon, and Lupus

University of Manchester, Manchester UK

 

John P. Atkinson, M.D.

Complement Mutations in End Stage Renal Disease Lupus Patients

Washington University School of Medicine

 

Derry C. Roopenian, Ph.D.

Novel Approach to Modeling the Functional Genomics of Human SLE in Mice

The Jackson Laboratory

 

Anne Satterthwaite, Ph.D.

Functional Relationships Between the Lupus Susceptibility LociLyn and Ets1

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Katherine A. Siminovitch, M.D.

Defining Functional Implications of a Human SLE Risk Allele in Mice

University Health Network

 

Lindsey Ann Criswell, M.D., Ph.D.

Functional Genomics and Pathway Analysis of the MCH Region in SLE

The Regents of the University of California, San Francisco

 

 

 

 

Additional 2011 TIL grant:

 

Principal Investigator

Research Project

Institution

 

David Pisetsky, M.D., Ph.D.

Nucleic Acid Binding Polymers in the Treatment for SLE (TIL Research Program)

Duke University Medical Center

 

 

About the ALR

The Alliance for Lupus Research (ALR) is a national voluntary health organization dedicated to finding better treatments and ultimately preventing and curing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, or lupus), a debilitating autoimmune disease. The organization is based in New York City and chaired by Robert Wood Johnson IV, a member of the founding family of Johnson & Johnson. Since its founding in 1999, the ALR has given more money to lupus research than any non-governmental agency in the world. The board of directors funds all administrative and fundraising costs, allowing one hundred percent of all donations from the public, and the proceeds of our signature grassroots fundraising program, Walk with Us To Cure Lupus, to go directly to support research programs. The organization has awarded more than $6 million in grants this year and, since 1999, has dedicated over $67 million to understanding the disease. More information can be found at www.lupusresearch.org.

 

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90 million

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