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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: New Test Could Give SLE Patients a More Tolerable Life

May 9, 2011

Five million people worldwide suffer from the chronic rheumatic disease SLE, systemic lupus erythematosus. Together with rheumatologists, researchers at Lund University in Sweden are on the way to developing a new test that could resolve a number of question marks surrounding the disease and in the long run improve the lives of SLE patients.

Their research is published in the next issue of the journal Molecular and Cellular Proteomics.

"At present, it can take up to a year before a patient is diagnosed with SLE. This is because the symptoms are diffuse and are often mistaken for other diseases. However, with this blood-based test, it is possible to determine quickly whether someone has the disease or not," says Christer Wingren, associate professor in Immunotechnology at CREATE Health, Lund University.

The test can also determine how far the disease has progressed. There are three different variants of SLE, and all require different treatment. With current methods, it is often difficult to find out which variant a patient has, which makes it difficult for doctors to prescribe the right medication. A third advantage of the new technique is that it also makes it possible to predict when the disease will become active.

...

Read the full article here

Source sciencedaily.com


Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: New Test Could Give SLE Patients a More Tolerable Life

May 9, 2011

Five million people worldwide suffer from the chronic rheumatic disease SLE, systemic lupus erythematosus. Together with rheumatologists, researchers at Lund University in Sweden are on the way to developing a new test that could resolve a number of question marks surrounding the disease and in the long run improve the lives of SLE patients.

Their research is published in the next issue of the journal Molecular and Cellular Proteomics.

"At present, it can take up to a year before a patient is diagnosed with SLE. This is because the symptoms are diffuse and are often mistaken for other diseases. However, with this blood-based test, it is possible to determine quickly whether someone has the disease or not," says Christer Wingren, associate professor in Immunotechnology at CREATE Health, Lund University.

The test can also determine how far the disease has progressed. There are three different variants of SLE, and all require different treatment. With current methods, it is often difficult to find out which variant a patient has, which makes it difficult for doctors to prescribe the right medication. A third advantage of the new technique is that it also makes it possible to predict when the disease will become active.

...

Read the full article here

Source sciencedaily.com



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