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Researchers Identify Risk Factors, Protective Medication for People Living With Lupus

According to research presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in San Diego, researchers have identified three potentially modifiable risk factors and one protective medication that may improve the health of people living with lupus.

Systemic lupus erythematosus, also called SLE or lupus, is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, lungs, nervous system, and/or other organs of the body. The most common symptoms include skin rashes and arthritis, often accompanied by fatigue and fever. Lupus occurs mostly in women, typically developing in individuals in their twenties and thirties - prime child- bearing age.

"Early tissue and organ damage in people with lupus can predict the likelihood of future damage and death due to the disease," says Ian N Bruce, MD, FRCP; professor of rheumatology at the University of Manchester, UK; current chair of the SLICC Inception Cohort; and lead investigator in the study. Dr. Bruce's team recently studied factors that might contribute to the development and progression of tissue and organ damage as well as the relationship between that damage and long-term survival rates. They found that increased disease activity, high blood pressure, and steroid use were associated with worsening damage, and the use of antimalarials protected against worsening damage from SLE.

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Click here to read full article.

Source: News Medical


Researchers Identify Risk Factors, Protective Medication for People Living With Lupus

According to research presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in San Diego, researchers have identified three potentially modifiable risk factors and one protective medication that may improve the health of people living with lupus.

Systemic lupus erythematosus, also called SLE or lupus, is a chronic inflammatory disease that can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, lungs, nervous system, and/or other organs of the body. The most common symptoms include skin rashes and arthritis, often accompanied by fatigue and fever. Lupus occurs mostly in women, typically developing in individuals in their twenties and thirties - prime child- bearing age.

"Early tissue and organ damage in people with lupus can predict the likelihood of future damage and death due to the disease," says Ian N Bruce, MD, FRCP; professor of rheumatology at the University of Manchester, UK; current chair of the SLICC Inception Cohort; and lead investigator in the study. Dr. Bruce's team recently studied factors that might contribute to the development and progression of tissue and organ damage as well as the relationship between that damage and long-term survival rates. They found that increased disease activity, high blood pressure, and steroid use were associated with worsening damage, and the use of antimalarials protected against worsening damage from SLE.

***

Click here to read full article.

Source: News Medical



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