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New Silicon Chips Help Identify Patients with Lupus

August 21, 2012

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Intel Corp. have collaborated to synthesize and study a grid-like array of short pieces of a disease-associated protein on silicon chips normally used in computer microprocessors. They used this chip, which was created through a process used to make semiconductors, to identify patients with a particularly severe form of the autoimmune disease lupus.

Although the new technology is focused on research applications, it has the potential to eventually improve diagnoses of a multitude of diseases, as well as to determine more quickly what drugs may be most effective for a particular patient. It may also speed drug development by enabling researchers to better understand how proteins interact in the body.

"When I see patients in the clinic right now, I may know they have arthritis, but I don't know which of the 20 or 30 types of the disease they have," said associate professor of medicine Paul (P.J.) Utz, MD, noting that existing methods can take days or even weeks to answer such questions. "Now we can measure thousands of protein interactions at a time, integrate this information to diagnose the disease and even determine how severe it may be. We may soon be able to do this routinely while the patient is still in the physician's office."

Utz is a co-senior author of the research, published online Aug. 19 in Nature Medicine. Postdoctoral scholar Chih Long Liu, PhD, and Madoo Varma, PhD, director and head of life science research operations and business strategy for Intel's Integrated Biosystems Laboratory, are the other senior authors. Graduate student Jordan Price is the first author. The research was funded in part by Intel Corp., and Intel scientists created the protein array on the silicon chips for the Stanford researchers to study.

Within each of our cells, proteins enter into and disband physical relationships in dizzying succession - outdoing even our most-freewheeling Facebook friends. This intricate dance forms the machinery responsible for driving cell growth, sparking immune reactions and even causing disease. But understanding the microscopic minutiae of their fleeting attractions (why exactly is protein X hooking up with protein Y?), and the subsequent biological repercussions, has been difficult and time-consuming.

To better understand these interactions, researchers at Intel synthesized short segments of biological proteins, called peptides, on silicon wafers. To do so, they turned to the same process used to make semiconductors, employing a method using sequential steps of light exposure and chemical reactions called photolithography. The Stanford researchers then used the chip, which they've termed an Intel array, to analyze thousands of protein interactions simultaneously to diagnose disease, assess therapies and even design more-effective drugs.

The researchers hope to eventually embed an integrated semiconductor circuit within the microprocessor-ready silicon chip to create a sort of minicomputer that could take the guesswork and decision-making out of many clinical processes. It could perhaps spell out patient-specific diagnoses with letters of the alphabet, or identify which potential treatments are most likely to be effective.

Click here to read the full article
Source www.news-medical.net


New Silicon Chips Help Identify Patients with Lupus

August 21, 2012

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Intel Corp. have collaborated to synthesize and study a grid-like array of short pieces of a disease-associated protein on silicon chips normally used in computer microprocessors. They used this chip, which was created through a process used to make semiconductors, to identify patients with a particularly severe form of the autoimmune disease lupus.

Although the new technology is focused on research applications, it has the potential to eventually improve diagnoses of a multitude of diseases, as well as to determine more quickly what drugs may be most effective for a particular patient. It may also speed drug development by enabling researchers to better understand how proteins interact in the body.

"When I see patients in the clinic right now, I may know they have arthritis, but I don't know which of the 20 or 30 types of the disease they have," said associate professor of medicine Paul (P.J.) Utz, MD, noting that existing methods can take days or even weeks to answer such questions. "Now we can measure thousands of protein interactions at a time, integrate this information to diagnose the disease and even determine how severe it may be. We may soon be able to do this routinely while the patient is still in the physician's office."

Utz is a co-senior author of the research, published online Aug. 19 in Nature Medicine. Postdoctoral scholar Chih Long Liu, PhD, and Madoo Varma, PhD, director and head of life science research operations and business strategy for Intel's Integrated Biosystems Laboratory, are the other senior authors. Graduate student Jordan Price is the first author. The research was funded in part by Intel Corp., and Intel scientists created the protein array on the silicon chips for the Stanford researchers to study.

Within each of our cells, proteins enter into and disband physical relationships in dizzying succession - outdoing even our most-freewheeling Facebook friends. This intricate dance forms the machinery responsible for driving cell growth, sparking immune reactions and even causing disease. But understanding the microscopic minutiae of their fleeting attractions (why exactly is protein X hooking up with protein Y?), and the subsequent biological repercussions, has been difficult and time-consuming.

To better understand these interactions, researchers at Intel synthesized short segments of biological proteins, called peptides, on silicon wafers. To do so, they turned to the same process used to make semiconductors, employing a method using sequential steps of light exposure and chemical reactions called photolithography. The Stanford researchers then used the chip, which they've termed an Intel array, to analyze thousands of protein interactions simultaneously to diagnose disease, assess therapies and even design more-effective drugs.

The researchers hope to eventually embed an integrated semiconductor circuit within the microprocessor-ready silicon chip to create a sort of minicomputer that could take the guesswork and decision-making out of many clinical processes. It could perhaps spell out patient-specific diagnoses with letters of the alphabet, or identify which potential treatments are most likely to be effective.

Click here to read the full article
Source www.news-medical.net



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