Go to content Go to navigation

LUPUS NEWS

Lupus in Newborns Predicts Heart Block in Siblings

April 9, 2010

Identification of cutaneous neonatal lupus in a child born to an autoantibody-positive mother is essential, because it predicts a high risk of congenital heart block in subsequent offspring, researchers warned.

Among a cohort of mothers who had had a child with any manifestation of neonatal lupus, the rate of cardiac complications in a subsequent pregnancy was 18.2%, according to Peter M. Izmirly, MD, of New York University School of Medicine in New York City, and colleagues.

This represented a nearly 10-fold risk above the 2% rate reported in children born to autoantibody positive mothers who have not had an affected child, the researchers reported in the April issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Neonatal lupus results from placental exposure to maternal anti-SSA/Ro or anti-SSB/La autoantibodies and most commonly manifests as annular or elliptical lesions on the head, trunk, and extremities.

The lesions themselves are benign, usually disappearing by six months, and often after having been diagnosed as seborrhea or dermatitis.

But the cutaneous lesions may be an important risk factor for serious involvement in subsequent offspring. Such children have developed conduction abnormalities, usually second- or third-degree heart block, as well as life-threatening cardiomyopathy.

Mortality has been estimated at 20% to 30%, and 67% of surviving children have required placement of a pacemaker before reaching adulthood.

Previous studies have found varying rates of neonatal lupus in affected families, so with the goal of more precisely determining the risks, Izmirly and colleagues enrolled 58 mothers from the Research Registry for Neonatal Lupus at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York.

All mothers were autoantibody positive, had given birth to a child with cutaneous neonatal lupus, and then had at least one more child.

Read the full article here

Source medpagetoday.com


Lupus in Newborns Predicts Heart Block in Siblings

April 9, 2010

Identification of cutaneous neonatal lupus in a child born to an autoantibody-positive mother is essential, because it predicts a high risk of congenital heart block in subsequent offspring, researchers warned.

Among a cohort of mothers who had had a child with any manifestation of neonatal lupus, the rate of cardiac complications in a subsequent pregnancy was 18.2%, according to Peter M. Izmirly, MD, of New York University School of Medicine in New York City, and colleagues.

This represented a nearly 10-fold risk above the 2% rate reported in children born to autoantibody positive mothers who have not had an affected child, the researchers reported in the April issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Neonatal lupus results from placental exposure to maternal anti-SSA/Ro or anti-SSB/La autoantibodies and most commonly manifests as annular or elliptical lesions on the head, trunk, and extremities.

The lesions themselves are benign, usually disappearing by six months, and often after having been diagnosed as seborrhea or dermatitis.

But the cutaneous lesions may be an important risk factor for serious involvement in subsequent offspring. Such children have developed conduction abnormalities, usually second- or third-degree heart block, as well as life-threatening cardiomyopathy.

Mortality has been estimated at 20% to 30%, and 67% of surviving children have required placement of a pacemaker before reaching adulthood.

Previous studies have found varying rates of neonatal lupus in affected families, so with the goal of more precisely determining the risks, Izmirly and colleagues enrolled 58 mothers from the Research Registry for Neonatal Lupus at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York.

All mothers were autoantibody positive, had given birth to a child with cutaneous neonatal lupus, and then had at least one more child.

Read the full article here

Source medpagetoday.com



1.5 million

people in the U.S. have Lupus.

90 million

dollars committed to lupus research by the Alliance for Lupus Research.


We're walking across the United States to raise awareness and funds for lupus research.

Can't make it? Join our National Virtual Walk to participate anytime, anywhere.


Show your support by visiting the Alliance for Lupus Research online store. Discover the perfect gift, or prepare for a walk with our selection of apparel and accessories.

Powered by Convio
nonprofit software