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Kill-switch Controls Immune-suppressing Cells

July 15, 2013

Scientists have uncovered the mechanism that controls whether cells that are able to suppress immune responses live or die. The discovery of the cell death processes that determine the number of "regulatory T-cells" an individual has could one day lead to better treatments for immune disorders.

Regulatory T-cells are members of a group of immune cells called T-cells. Most T-cells actively respond to clear the body of infections. By contrast, regulatory T-cells are considered to be immune suppressing cells because they can "switch off" an immune response to a particular molecule. This immune suppression is important for preventing inappropriate immune attack of the body’s own tissues, which is the underlying cause of autoimmune diseases such as lupus and type 1 diabetes.

A shortage of regulatory T-cells is linked with the development of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, while some people with higher than normal numbers of regulatory T-cells cannot fight infections properly.

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Click here to read the full article.

Source: Bioscience Technology


Kill-switch Controls Immune-suppressing Cells

July 15, 2013

Scientists have uncovered the mechanism that controls whether cells that are able to suppress immune responses live or die. The discovery of the cell death processes that determine the number of "regulatory T-cells" an individual has could one day lead to better treatments for immune disorders.

Regulatory T-cells are members of a group of immune cells called T-cells. Most T-cells actively respond to clear the body of infections. By contrast, regulatory T-cells are considered to be immune suppressing cells because they can "switch off" an immune response to a particular molecule. This immune suppression is important for preventing inappropriate immune attack of the body’s own tissues, which is the underlying cause of autoimmune diseases such as lupus and type 1 diabetes.

A shortage of regulatory T-cells is linked with the development of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, while some people with higher than normal numbers of regulatory T-cells cannot fight infections properly.

***

Click here to read the full article.

Source: Bioscience Technology



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