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Commonly Used Drugs May not be Effective Against Autoimmune Illness

March 14, 2014

Drugs for autoimmune diseases like lupus that block only one of the two principal signaling pathways can activate an overabundance of one potentially disease-causing type of immune cell population over another, a Yale study has found.

The findings about T lymphocytes, white blood cells that regulate the immune response, have implications for the development of new vaccination strategies and therapies for autoimmune diseases. The study appears in the Cell Press journal Immunity.

The researchers studied this process in a model of viral infection that is similar to human influenza and certain autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). They uncovered opposing roles for signaling pathways STAT3 and type I interferon (IFN) in differentiating the T helper cells that regulate immune cell response to viruses. Blockade of one resulted in an increase of T helper cells in the other that could lead to an immune system overreaction, and, ultimately, in lupus, exacerbation of the autoimmune disease.

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Click here to read full article.

Source: Health Canal


Commonly Used Drugs May not be Effective Against Autoimmune Illness

March 14, 2014

Drugs for autoimmune diseases like lupus that block only one of the two principal signaling pathways can activate an overabundance of one potentially disease-causing type of immune cell population over another, a Yale study has found.

The findings about T lymphocytes, white blood cells that regulate the immune response, have implications for the development of new vaccination strategies and therapies for autoimmune diseases. The study appears in the Cell Press journal Immunity.

The researchers studied this process in a model of viral infection that is similar to human influenza and certain autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). They uncovered opposing roles for signaling pathways STAT3 and type I interferon (IFN) in differentiating the T helper cells that regulate immune cell response to viruses. Blockade of one resulted in an increase of T helper cells in the other that could lead to an immune system overreaction, and, ultimately, in lupus, exacerbation of the autoimmune disease.

***

Click here to read full article.

Source: Health Canal



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