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Biomarker Linked to Poor Outcomes in Pregnant Lupus Patients

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City have identified a biomarker that may predict poor pregnancy outcomes in lupus patients. The study, titled "Angiogenic Factor Dysregulation and Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcome In Lupus Pregnancies" will be presented at the American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals Annual Meeting on October 27 in San Diego.

Investigators found that an imbalance of angiogenic factors, proteins required for the development of the placenta and the health of blood vessels, is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes. Increased levels of an anti-angiogenic protein called sFlt1 in pregnant lupus patients placed them at increased risk of placental insufficiency and preeclampsia, a potentially life-threatening complication. Scientists determined that higher levels of sFlt1 reduce the activity of other angiogenic proteins (placental growth factor, PIGF; vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) that are necessary for growth of the placenta and the mother's blood vessels.

"Pregnant women with lupus or antiphospholipid syndrome are at increased risk for adverse outcomes, particularly preeclampsia, yet identification of those destined for complications has been elusive," said Jane Salmon, MD, director of the Lupus and APS Center of Excellence at Hospital for Special Surgery and lead author of the study. "We prospectively studied patients to see if we could find a biomarker early in pregnancy that would predict a poor outcome."

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Click here to read full article.

Source: Science Daily


Biomarker Linked to Poor Outcomes in Pregnant Lupus Patients

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City have identified a biomarker that may predict poor pregnancy outcomes in lupus patients. The study, titled "Angiogenic Factor Dysregulation and Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcome In Lupus Pregnancies" will be presented at the American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals Annual Meeting on October 27 in San Diego.

Investigators found that an imbalance of angiogenic factors, proteins required for the development of the placenta and the health of blood vessels, is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes. Increased levels of an anti-angiogenic protein called sFlt1 in pregnant lupus patients placed them at increased risk of placental insufficiency and preeclampsia, a potentially life-threatening complication. Scientists determined that higher levels of sFlt1 reduce the activity of other angiogenic proteins (placental growth factor, PIGF; vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) that are necessary for growth of the placenta and the mother's blood vessels.

"Pregnant women with lupus or antiphospholipid syndrome are at increased risk for adverse outcomes, particularly preeclampsia, yet identification of those destined for complications has been elusive," said Jane Salmon, MD, director of the Lupus and APS Center of Excellence at Hospital for Special Surgery and lead author of the study. "We prospectively studied patients to see if we could find a biomarker early in pregnancy that would predict a poor outcome."

***

Click here to read full article.

Source: Science Daily



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